Wed

22

Jan

2014

Venus of Willendorf

The Venus of Willendorf is a Venusfigurine from the Upper Palaeolithic, the Gravettian, and can be seen as Austria's most famous treasure piece today at the Natural History Museum in Vienna.

The representation is so realistic that an invention is considered as excluded. Some rests of  paint that remain show, that the sculpture was originally covered with red ocher.

So-called "venus figurines", female nudes standing upright, designed to be stuck in the ground, and then covered with red ochre, were made as an unbroken artistic and symbolic tradition of the Eurasian continent that lastet for at least 30.000 years (between 40.000 B.C-10.000 B.C).

 

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Mon

04

Mar

2013

Venus of Hohle Fels

The Venus of Hohle Fels (also known as the Venus of Schelklingen) is an Upper Paleolithic Venus figurine hewn from ivory of a mammoth tusk found in 2008 near SchelklingenGermany.

 

It is dated to between 35,000 and 40,000 years ago, belonging to the early Aurignacian, at the very beginning of the Upper Paleolithic, which is associated with the assumed earliest presence of Homo sapiens in Europe (Cro-Magnon).

 

It is the oldest undisputed example of Upper Paleolithic art and figurative prehistoric art in general.

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